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Communities of Ocean Action
Ocean acidification
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Introduction
Ocean acidification has increased by roughly 26% since pre-industrial times because of increased releases of CO2 due to the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities. Ocean acidification is detrimental to many marine species, such as coral reefs and other species with calcium carbonate skeletons, with impacts on their physiology and long-term fitness. These impacts, in combination with increases in upper-ocean temperature, stratification and de-oxygenation of sub-surface waters can affect processes fundamental to the overall structure and functioning of marine ecosystems with far-reaching consequences and potentially profound socio-economic impacts. The potential for marine organisms to adapt to increasing CO2 and the broader implications for ocean ecosystems are not well known and require further research.

Approximately 70 voluntary commitments relate to ocean acidification, either as their main component, or as part of a broader range of management and conservation actions. Specific activities include scientific research and research collaborations, building resilience against impacts of ocean acidification, and activities related to mitigation and carbon sequestration.

This Community of Ocean Action aims to support its members in implementing their ocean acidification-related voluntary commitments by exchanging progress reports, experiences, lessons learned and good practices.
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Focal points
  • Mr. Bronte Tilbrook (Australia - CSIRO), co-chair, Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOAON)
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