#OceanAction15083
Mainstreaming ocean conservation and sustainable fisheries in Mexico through effective participation and citizen science.
by Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C. (COBI) (Civil society organization)
We can make the difference in promoting a global change for sustainable resource management and ocean conservation alongside integrating biodiversity into economic sectors such as fisheries. We will achieve this through effective participation, citizen science and an ecosystem based approach.

Our organization operates in four of Mexico's 17 coastal states, where 70% of the countrys total industrial and small-scale fisheries production is concentrated. With the aim of driving the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14 and its associated targets to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans, our organization:

Has developed a capacity-building program which works with 30 partner fishing cooperatives that we have trained to promote legal, consensual, inclusive, sustainable and competitive fishing practices.

Has actively participated in the implementation of international sustainability fishery standards for the eco-certification of Mexican fisheries, and promoted Fisheries Improvement Projects (FIPs) in small-scale fisheries, with 10 fisheries currently working to apply the standards.

Has participated in the creation of 78,920 hectares of fully protected marine reserves in collaboration with fishing communities. The reserves where created under the existing management instruments in Mexico: core zones, fish refuges, and voluntary fully-protected marine reserves, with 170 commercial species moving towards sustainable management. These actions have involved 194 fishermen and 28 fisherwomen trained to collect data on over 348 species. Over 12,000 transects in three ecosystems have been completed, and this has generated the information necessary to make science-based management decisions for coastal marine resource use.

Has informed two initiatives at the public policy level for restoring marine ecosystems and improving public social participation in fisheries management.

In this sense, Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C. (COBI) is committed to keep fostering the following actions:

An escalation of our capacity-building leadership program to reinforce our partner fishing cooperatives, and to strengthen human development, common wellbeing, communication, conflict resolution, and negotiation.

An increase in the application of international sustainable fishery standards and fishery improvement projects in small-scale Mexican fisheries.

An expansion of the coverage of marine areas protected by communities under management instruments: core zones, fish refuges, and voluntary fully-protected marine reserves.

The holding of annual "Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Certification Workshops", with the participation of different key stakeholders, to reverse poorly directed fishery subsidies and foster a National Plan for Fisheries Sustainability and an Intersectoral Alliance for Sustainability, in order to adapt eco-certifications to the context of Mexico and achieve their implementation on a permanent basis.

To develop and consolidate our new project "Gender Equality at Sea", in order to achieve gender equality in the decision-making process for marine conservation and fisheries management. Women in fishing communities have an important role but cannot always participate in the processes.

We are highly aware that the responsibility to manage and conserve biological resources relies upon each of us, so, to ensure the replication of our successful fisheries collective action models at both the national and international level we must continue our collaborative work with governments, communities, academia, researchers, civil society organizations, the private sector and other stakeholders, to create a representative, connected, integrated approach to ocean and marine resource conservation in Mexico.
14.2
By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans
Type of commitment
  • Community or Locally Managed Marine Areas
  • Integrated Coastal Management
  • Ecosystem-based Adaptation
14.4
By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics
Type of commitment
  • Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
  • Reduction and elimination fishing practices and gear that destroy/degrade marine habitat
  • Science-based fisheries management plans
  • Ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF)
  • Eco-labelling, traceability, certification programmes
14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information
Type of commitment
  • No take marine protected area
  • Locally or community managed marine areas
  • MPA management and/or enforcement
14.6
By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation
Type of commitment
  • information relating to harmful subsidies
14.a
Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries
Type of commitment
  • Scientific, socioeconomic and interdisciplinary research
  • Research capacity development
  • Data access and sharing
  • Training and professional development
14.b
Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets
Type of commitment
  • Legal/policy/institutional measures
  • Access to market-based instruments
  • Access and capacity building for eco-labelling and traceability systems
  • Community empowerment for fisheries management
14.c
Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want
Type of commitment
  • Activities to raise awareness of the comprehensive legal and policy framework for the sustainable development of oceans and seas, in particular UNCLOS, its Implementing Agreements and other relevant ocean-related instruments and promote their effective im
  • Activities to develop the capacity of States towards broader participation in and effective implementation of UNCLOS and its implementing Agreements
  • Strengthening ocean governance, for example through the development of a national ocean policy or regional ocean policy
December/2017
An increase in the application of international sustainable fishery standards and fishery improvement projects within at least two small-scale mexican fisheries, and the following-up of five other artisanal fisheries that have implemented fishery improvement projects, improving capacity-building for sustainable fisheries.
December/2018
The implementation of our capacity-building leadership program for 16th partner fishing cooperatives which we work with, and their strengthening for human development, common wellbeing, communication, conflict resolution, and negotiation. This includes the development and consolidation of the project Gender Equality at Sea, in order to achieve gender equality in the decision-making process for marine preservation and fishery management.
December/2018
An increase of at least 10 marine areas protected by communities under management instruments: core zones, fish refuges, and voluntary fully-protected marine reserves.
December/2018
The creation of 1 Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Award as a public policy incentive, in order to recognize fishers and aquaculturists who carry out sustainable and responsible practices
Other, please specify
Financing (in USD), In-kind contribution, Staff/Technical expertise
Other, please specify
Financing (in USD), In-kind contribution, Staff/Technical expertise
Other, please specify
Financing (in USD), In-kind contribution, Staff/Technical expertise
Other, please specify
Financing (in USD), In-kind contribution, Staff/Technical expertise
Interact
#OceanAction15083
Basic information
Time-frame: January/2017 - December/2018
Partners
Partnerships: Community fishing cooperatives, Global Partnership for Small-Scale Fisheries Research, Kanan'Kay Alliance, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, International Community Foundation, Marisla Foundation, Helmsley Foundation, Oak Foundation, Walton Family Foundation, Mar Alliance, Consultative Group on Biological Diversity, CORAL REEF ALLIANCE, Global Vision International, Interamerican Foundation, International Community Foundation, Red De Pescadores Del Caribe Guatemalteco. CSO: Niparaja, Causa Natura, ProNatura, EDF, FMCN, WWF, Healthy Reefs Initiative, The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, Gloverís Reef Research Station, Reef Check, Healthy Reefs for Healthy People, Oceanus, Mar Fund, Amigos de Sian Kaían, Art of Conservation. Academic institutions: Arizona University, Duke University, British Columbia University, Stanford University, California University, UNAM (Mexico), CINVESTAV (Mexico), IPN (Mexico), UABC (Mexico), Universidad de Sonora (Mexico), Smithsonian Institution, CEDO (Mexico), CICESE (Mexico), El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, ECOSUR, Londonís Global University. Scientific community: The Next Generation Sonoran Desert Researchers (N-Gen), Perry Institute of Marine Sciences, Center for Ocean Solutions, World Resources Institute. Government: the National Commision of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CONAPESCA), the National Fisheries Research (INAPESCA), the Fisheries and Aquaculture Commission of the Senate, the Fisheries Comission of the Lower Chamber, the Mexican Women Institute (INMUJERES). Intergovernmental organizations: CONMECOOP, FEDECOOP, CANAINPESCA, Environmental Project International. UN entities: FAO, UNDP, UNEP. Others: SmartFish, FishWise, MSC, MBA, FairTrade, Shared Leadership, Banamex, HSBC.
Ocean Basins
  • North Atlantic
  • North Pacific
Beneficiary countries
Mexico
Other beneficaries
The countries with which we share the Mesoamerican Reef: Belize, Guatemala and Honduras.
Contact information
Oscar Velez, Public Policy Advisor, ovelez@cobi.org.mx, +5215555747909
Isla del Peruano 215, Colonia Lomas de Miramar, Guaymas, Sonora, ZP 85448, Mexico
Other SDGs
United Nations