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#OceanAction22131
Compliance, Monitoring and Enforcement.
by Environmental Justice Foundation (Non-governmental organization (NGO))
Increasing food production to meet the needs of a growing world population while at the same time reducing the ecological footprint of food production, protecting natural resources and ecosystems, and advancing rural development is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Hunger malnutrition is rampant in the world. more than 800 million people are believed to suffer from chronic Mal-nourishment due to low protein intake, source of protein in many poor and developing countries. As is widely recognized that wild fish stocks are no longer able to support world seafood demand, the demand for seafood is increasingly met by aquaculture. The sector is already providing about 50 percent of all fish and shellfish consumed globally but it is nevertheless expected to more than double in capacity by 2050, however, the current production systems, particularly those relying on feed, may have some negative impacts on ecosystems and society that need to be addressed. Finding solutions to promote sustainable aquaculture systems for food production is therefore essential. Fish and shellfish are a major food resource for a large number of people but also provide critical Eco-system services. Consequently, viable fish populations need to be maintained to promote both human well being and ocean health. Over-fishing has serve consequences as it changes the structure and functions of the ecosystem and has dramatic impacts on socioeconomic development. Thus, there is an urgent need to protect and restore wild fish populations through responsible governance of fish and fisheries. the aqua cultural sector plays an important role in providing fish and other seafood products yet is facing some major challenges. We need to find solutions that minimize the environmental impacts of released organic and inorganic waste as well as the unsustainable use of wild marine species for the supply of juvenile and feeds. Expansion of the sector must include a shift toward innovative aquaculture systems and feed production that does not negatively impact wild populations.
14.4
By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics
Type of commitment
  • Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
December 2018
Research capacity development
December 2018
Research capacity development
July 2017
Research capacity development
July 2017
Research capacity development
Staff / Technical expertise
Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
Staff / Technical expertise
Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
Staff / Technical expertise
Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
Staff / Technical expertise
Compliance, monitoring and enforcement
Interact
#OceanAction22131
Basic information
Time-frame: July 2017 - December 2018
Partners
Environmental Justice Foundation
Ocean Basins
  • Arctic Ocean
Beneficiary countries
Other beneficaries
United Kingdom
Contact information
ACHIRIMBI NGWA JOSEPH, Indigenous Training Programme, achirimbijos@yahoo.com, +237698416857
Bamenda, North West Region Cameroon.
Other SDGs
United Nations